You are viewing firiel11


Has anyone from Germany heard this specific story ("a feral child adopted by St. Nicholas") before? I know that Ruprecht folklore differs from region to region but I want to know about this specific feral child story, just to be sure that it exists. Also if you're German and have heard stories about the "origins" of Knecht Ruprecht, I wouldn't mind hearing about them :)

I did find a similar story here but I don't know how reliable that is.
Thanks for any help and apologies for the long post. Reposted for clarity about what I'm actually looking for and more relevant answers.

Ispiration for my Icelandic fantasy novel


My Icelandic fantasy novel, Thorinn's Company (an extract posted here) was inspired by many different sources.

List hereCollapse )

1. Oliver Twist

This Charles Dickens novel written in 1837 was the inspiration for the whole set-up; Fagin's gang of child thieves is the basis of Thorinn's gang with Thorinn's constant use of endearments to refer to the kids and the kids' professions as thieves.

2. Bear's Son Tales
This is a group of folktales featuring heroes who are either fostered by bears or other animals or born of a marriage between a bear and a human. These heroes are often supernaturally strong with bearish traits and the plots have common features like

3. The Poetic Edda


4. The ballad "Little Sir Hugh."

Characterisation in Volsunga Saga


What in your opinion are the most important character traits to keep in mind in the Volsunga Saga? By that I mean for those posters who know the saga, what images and personality traits come to mind when you see the names 'Sigurd', 'Brynhild' and 'Fáfnir'?

How do I make the characters my own and flesh them out, especially the villains? I want the readers to feel the raw emotions in the saga and understand and relate to the characters even if they don't sympathise with them. So for example, the audience would realise that Gudrún killed her children so even though they wouldn't sympathise with her for doing that, they'd understand why she took that step to get her revenge on Atli.

Cultural accuracy check?


Is anyone willing to be a beta reader for a story i have planned dealing with Aleut and Yup'ik culture and folklore?

Santa Evita


Please, gentle Eva,
Will you bless a little child?
For I love you,
Tell Heaven I'm doing my best,
I'm praying for you
Even though you're already blessed.

Please, mother Eva,
Will you look upon me as your own?
Make me special, be my angel, be my everything wonderful perfect and true,
And I'll try to be exactly like you.

Please, holy Eva,
Will you feed a hungry child?
For I love you,
Tell Heaven I'm doing my best
I'm praying for you
Even though you're already blessed

Please, mother Eva,
Will you feed a hungry child?
For I love you,
(Turn a blind eye, Evita, turn a blind eye)
Tell Heaven I'm doing my best,
I'm praying for you,
Even though you're already blessed


Santa Santa Evita,
Madre de todos los niños,
De los decamisados, de los tiranizados,
De los trabajadores, de la Argentina

Why try to govern a country when you can become a saint? 

Sums up cults of personality, doesn't it? Everyone is taught from an early age to regard the leader as a heroic, god-like figure, "The mother (or father) of the nation", the greatest national hero etc, sometimes even as especially close to divine power. Some of these leaders "try to become saints" rather than "govern a country."

Used the reins


I actually got to use the reins in my riding lesson today :)

Tags:

Retelling of musical


I must be weird, cause my latest project is a sci-fi novel called Cuba Libre which is a loose retelling of Evita by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice. It's very loosely based though.

Song matches up with novel scene?


I just realised how well the song You Must Love Me from Evita fits the entry on pg 31 of Cuba Libre. Che overhears a conversation between Celia and Fidel about Fidel's errand/suicide mission for the local organised crime syndicate. The conversation gets pretty intense with Celia calling Fidel "too proud" and "crazy" for taking the job.
 
In fact, she's wondering how they got there in the first place, as he quit soon after they met and got a job as a servant for Juan and Eva along with her. He's wondering pretty much the same thing "Where do we go from here/This isn't where we intended to be/We had it all, you believed in me/I believed in you". They believed they would both have enough, that they wouldn't have to go this route just to have more money. He's leaving because "certainties disappear" and he has to do it for "our dreams to survive" and "to keep all our passions alive" because the stress of doing nothing would drain the life out of both of them.

"Deep in my heart I'm concealing/Things that I'm longing to say/Scared to confess what I'm feeling/Frightened you'll slip away/You must love me" She's got lots of hidden feelings, including the fear that he'll "slip away" and get deeper into it. But "you must love me" because he's doing it out of good intentions. Has anyone else had this happen? In my case, it's probably because CL is EVITA IN CUBA Twenty Minutes In The Future! [Link to TV Tropes] (2143, although it's never stated)


Red: I didn't say anything about  Phyllis' weight that the whole room didn't already know!

Jackie: Michael, are they drinking out of my parents' crystals?

Day Dah Light


(CHORUS)
Day-o, day-o,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.
Day-o, day-o,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.

(CHORUS)

1. Come missa tallyman, come tally mi banana,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.
Come missa tallyman, come tally mi banana,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.

Mi come yah fi wuk, mi no come yah fi igle,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.
No gi mi soso bunch, mi no horse wid bridle,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.

(CHORUS)

2. Check a dem a check, but dem check wid caution,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.
Mi back dis a bruk wid pure exhaustion,
Day dah light an' mi waan go home.

(CHORUS)

This is an old work song traditionally sung by banana loaders at dawn. It was the basis for Harry Belafonte's "Day-O (The Banana Boat Song)" which was a rearranged version done by Lord Burgess (Irving Burgie)